Letter: We were not taught to hate

Posted 9/18/20

To the Editor:

I was born and raised on the Cherokee Indian Reservation. I am a tribal member — born 1932 — and I would like to say a few words to the Black and white people. When I was living …

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Letter: We were not taught to hate

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Posted

To the Editor:

I was born and raised on the Cherokee Indian Reservation. I am a tribal member — born 1932 — and I would like to say a few words to the Black and white people. When I was living on the reservation and also when I went back to visit ... I never once heard anyone say anything about another race. We were not taught to hate anyone. Now hate is being passed down.

Anytime I can turn on TV and see Indians slaughtered and they were run off to live on the worst possible land. As a child I lived on top of a mountain; we had raggedy clothes and my dad raised all our food. There were no jobs there. I don’t regret my life there as I now appreciate every small thing.

I don’t understand why the Blacks are so mad. They have the same opportunity as everyone. We have many rich, famous Black people — Oprah, Steve Harvey, Gayle King. I could name many and that is not counting the rich famous ballplayers and musicians.

So, why are they mad? What else could they need? Could it be power? Do they want a Black president, Black Congress, House and everyone in public life to be Black?

It is dangerous. My understanding of the Bible is to be forgiven, we have to forgive many times. Our most precious possession is your soul. I felt the power of God when I was 16. I strayed but God didn’t give up on me. Let the Holy Spirit deal with your heart. Thank about your eternal soul.

I am not picking on the Blacks … whites are mad, too, but they are not marching or rioting and destroying property.

Candy M. Smith

Siler City

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