Educator of the Week: Sherman Howze | Chatham Central High School

Posted 11/1/19

Grades/subjects you teach: online facilitator; coach

E-mail address: showze@chatham.k12.nc.us

Place of birth: Buffalo, New York

Education: High Point Central High School, East Carolina …

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Educator of the Week: Sherman Howze | Chatham Central High School

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Posted

Grades/subjects you teach: online facilitator; coach

E-mail address: showze@chatham.k12.nc.us

Place of birth: Buffalo, New York

Education: High Point Central High School, East Carolina University, Everest University, Purdue University Global Bachelor of Science Early Childhood Development

Brief work history: I started in the education field in 1999 in Melbourne, Florida, at Florida Air Academy from 1999 to 2009. After working in South Carolina, I came to Salisbury, North Carolina, where I worked in the exceptional children department at North Rowan Middle School for five years. Later, I spent a year at Northeast Guilford High School and three years at Olympic High School.

Teaching honors/awards: 2019-20 Chatham Central High School Instructional Assistant of the Year

Hobbies/interests outside teaching: Bowling

Family: wife Tanya; children Emmitt, Chris, Nicole

What led you to a career as a teacher?: I wanted to get involved. I always wanted to work in the education field. I always have said if I can make a difference, it would be to make a difference in the school systems.

Who were your favorite teachers as you went through school, and what did you learn from them?: My 6th-grade and 9th-grade teachers, Ms. Hill and my English teacher Ms. Harris, and my high school head football coach, Tony Mills. I learned leadership and love, what you do to change lives and have an impact on somebody.

Has becoming a teacher been all you expected it would be?: Yes, and more.

 

How has teaching changed since you were a student?: I truly think when I was in school we did a lot more. They taught one-on-one, and we really took it in.

What makes your day as a teacher?: Knowing that I have done what I needed to do to help someone for that moment.

Best piece of advice for other teachers?: Teach your students the way you were taught.

For students?: Take education seriously, work harder in class.

For parents?: Know what your kids are doing and how they are doing in school.

If you were superintendent for a day, you’d: I don’t know what I would do.

What about your job would surprise your non-teaching friends the most?: My job.

If you could somehow magically instill one truth into the heads of your students, what would it be?: Stay in school, and take the teaching we teach, because we love it.

When you think about today’s kids, you: I shake my head, because a lot of kids can’t see past tomorrow. I have seen a lot in this field — some good, a lot of bad. That’s why I got into the field, to make a difference in young people’s lives.

If one of your students was asked for a one-word description of you by a student who hadn’t had you in class, what would that one word be?: Funny.

Favorite movie about school or teaching: “Remember the Titans,” because you see leadership, bonding, caring, hope.

What five things must every teacher know?: Know your students. Know the good about them and the bad. What makes your students go? What’s holding them back? What’s their background and family history regarding education?

What’s special about your classroom?: The person that I am, the stories I tell students about my experiences in high school.

What’s special about your school?: The people I work with and for. Teacher-student relationships for learning. The day I stepped on Chatham Central’s campus, I knew it was the place for me.

What’s working in schools today?: Having a hardworking staff that believes in what they’re both doing for and teaching the students.

What’s your favorite memory of your first year as a teacher?: How everyone took me in.

How would your teacher persona handle you as a student?: Very good.

Best piece of advice for other teachers?: Teach your students the way you were taught. It’s different now than the way I was taught. We were more hands-on and wanted to learn.

What about your job would surprise your non-teaching friends the most?: What all of my responsibilities are, plus with the coaching.

How would you summarize your teaching philosophy?: I just think my philosophy is to be there for the students no matter what’s going on with them. I try to build a trust relationship with my student to where if they have a problem maybe I could help them.

What’s special about your classroom?: The person that I am, the stories you tell students and your experience you had in high school. You can come do your work. I always talk about education with my students, and the one question they have is why do I do this. My answer always is I want you guys to finish, walk across that stage and get out of Bear Creek, go to college, stay in school, get a degree.

What’s special about your school?: The people you work with and for. The students you’re building a teacher-student relationship for learning. The day I stepped on Chatham Central’s campus, I knew it was the place for me. The love from the staff. There is a warm spirit in this school. There’s no other feeling like it.

Most unusual question you’ve ever gotten from a student?: “Why Chatham Central?” I replied by saying, “Why not? I love it here. I love working with the staff.”

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